Sorry for the Shameless Self-Promotion

Normally, I don’t spend time reading book reviews. But earlier tonight I read a review of But the Angels Never Came, one I hadn’t seen before, and had to post it here on the blog. As writers we get all kinds of criticism. Some of its good. Some ain’t so good. Some of its fair. Some of it makes us wonder if the reviewer actually knows how to read.thG0CMNJK9 I’m posting this because the review I read earlier tonight is the most generous critique of my writing thus far. I added pictures to make it even more awesome. Check it out:

I’m not a huge reader of apocalyptic ci-fi, but every once in a while something comes along that catches my fancy. This was one of those books. For one thing, how the near-future comes about had a scary sense of realism to it, as if it were a straightforward, logical extrapolation from news making the headlines today. That, of course, makes the tale just that much more disturbing, as if this could well be something many of us will be living through down the road. It’s a very dark future that I don’t want any part of, so in that vein, these kinds of books serve as a great wake up call to snap us out of our lethargy and make what small efforts we can today to see that this destiny is not carved in stone.

Despite the clear biblical references, this is in no way requires a fan of Christian-based fiction to enjoy the story; its audience is much broader. There is a Book of Eli feel to the novel, for those of you who saw the film, but this is far deeper, and more profound to my thinking. And you don’t have to wait until the end for the profound and prophetic material to click into place; it’s there from page one. As sci-fi based on religious parables go—not that I read a lot of those either—this has become my new favorite.
thTNG0KB0C
The writing style is smooth, polished, and flowing, making this a fairly effortless read at any speed. The pacing with the plotting is thSYV17UMFquite good, just enough to balance character development with action, and leave the right amount of room for the infusion of the philosophical ideas. While this is arguably thinking man’s sci-fi, it’s not so heady as to be off-putting to folks just looking for a fun story.

While we have a lot of staple scenes that are de rigueur for this genre, I like the extra layer of polish the addition of the double timeline gives us, with the old storyteller conveying to the young lad the apocalyptic happenings early on that leads to an even greater and protracted downward spiral.
But_the_Angels_Never_Cover_for_Kindle
Pound for pound, I enjoyed this foray into a dark future world much better than the one that won the Pulitzer Prize for covering much the same subject matter, The Road. Maybe there’s no allowing for taste. Or is there?

CLICK THE LINK : (BUY NOW ON AMAZON FOR 3.99)

 

You heard it folks. The book rocks. Thanks for reading and sorry for the shameless self-promotion.

 

 

About Eric James-Olson

Eric James-Olson writes novels and short stories. Currently, he's working on a coming-of-age novel set in the Panhandle of West-Virginia. Check out the "Novels by Eric James-Olson" tab above for the titles of his other books. In addition to writing, James-Olson is a high school English teacher, an amateur woodworker, and an outdoor enthusiast. He lives with his wife and daughter in West Virginia. View all posts by Eric James-Olson

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